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July 22, 2021 / Joanne Yeck

Buckingham County Crimes: The Murder of Meade Hanes, Part XXVII

Richard E. Byrd, Sr. Courtesy Wikipedia.

Need to catch up? Click here to begin the series: Buckingham County Crimes: The Murder of Meade Hanes, Part I

On January 9, 1914 Richmond’s the Times-Dispatch revisited the case against Mott Glover with this surprising headline: “Poetry Failed to Prove Him Crazy. Mott Glover, Who quoted It at Dance, Can’t Escape Term For Killing Meade Haines (sic).” The article opened: “The Supreme Court of Appeals yesterday refused to intervene in the case of Mott R. Glover, convicted of the murder of Meade Haines and sentenced to eighteen years in the penitentiary.”

A typical recap followed. Then the article refers to a transcript of the trial, revealing that a second appeal had been presented to the Supreme Court of Virginia.

. . . The transcript of record shows a number of instances, including a Christmas dance, at which Glover repeated some poetry without being asked to say anything, several of the neighbors testifying that they regarded these incidences as queer, and possibly as indications that Glover was losing his mind.

The petition had once before been refused by the Supreme Court would presented by Hal D. Flood and John B. Moon, attorneys. The second petition was presented by Richard Evelyn Byrd.

This mention of the neighbors who testified concerning Mott Glover’s sanity reinforces what seem to be fundamental contradictions in the case, leaving us unsure about his condition. Had his mind never fully developed, as the doctors suggested? Did his erratic behavior indicate a deteriorating mind? Or, had he planned and executed the murder of Meade Hanes with forethought?

Richard E. Byrd’s involvement in the case is a significant new detail. To learn more about Byrd’s life and family, click here: Richard Evelyn Byrd Sr.

Coming Next: Buckingham County Crimes: The Murder of Meade Hanes, Part XXVIII

July 15, 2021 / Joanne Yeck

Buckingham County Crimes: The Murder of Meade Hanes, Part XXVI

Need to catch up? Click here to begin the series: Buckingham County Crimes: The Murder of Meade Hanes, Part I

Unsurprisingly, the Glover family launched an appeal. On October 22, 1913, Richmond’s Times-Dispatch reported the results.

GLOVER FAILS TO WIN APPEAL

The Supreme Court of Appeals yesterday refused to interfere in the case of Mott R. Glover, sentenced to eighteen years in the State Penitentiary for murder, he must shortly begin his term. The application for an appeal came from the Circuit Court of Buckingham County, where Glover was convicted on August 12 for his murder of Meade Haines (sic) on May 5.

Judge R. Carter Scott, of Richmond, sat in the trial by appointment of the Governor in place of Judge Hundley.

The prisoner set up the plea of insanity and introduced evidence to show that he had, about the time of the killing, been more or less irrational, showing a desire to repeat poetry at inopportune times. He was examined by Dr. [A. S.] Priddy and Dr. W. F. Drewry, State experts on Insanity, who agreed that while rational and responsible he was an underdeveloped type, having at thirty-two years of age the mental development of a boy of twelve to fifteen. Dr. Priddy testified that while not insane, the prisoner was mentally defective, having a dwarfed mind.

This was shown, he testified, by the fact that a man of his age should have become infatuated with a girl wearing short skirts, barely fourteen years of age, and should have shown intense jealousy of her playmate and cousin, a boy of fourteen. The trial jury held him guilty, and fixed his punishment eighteen years in the penitentiary. He was represented by Hal D. Flood, Moon & Pitts and Sands Gayle. All of the Supreme Court judges concerned in refusing the petition for appeal.

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Click here to learn more about the doctors who examined Mott Glover:

Buckingham County Crimes: The Murder of Meade Hanes, Part XXII

Coming Next: Buckingham County Crimes: The Murder of Meade Hanes, Part XXVII

July 8, 2021 / Joanne Yeck

Buckingham County Crimes: The Murder of Meade Hanes, Part XXV

Need to catch up? Click here to begin the series: Buckingham County Crimes: The Murder of Meade Hanes, Part I

On August 13, Richmond’s Times-Dispatch published the verdict in the case against Mott Glover. Inexplicably, the newspaper got his name wrong — calling him Sam Glover.

SAM GLOVER GETS EIGHTEEN YEARS

Jury Brings In Verdict of Murder in the Second Degree.

Buckingham Courthouse, Va., August 12. — The jury in the Sam Glover murder trial, for the killing of Hanes, brought in a verdict of murder in the second degree, a sentence of eighteen years in the penitentiary. The verdict was a surprise, owing to the brutality of the crime. Hon. A. E. Strode, of Amherst, opened the argument for the Commonwealth in a strong speech. Hon. F. C. Moon followed in a two hour speech, trying to convince the twelve men that Glover should be a free man. Congressman Flood, in a strong effort, presented the most potent points of the defense, and Hon. E. W. Hubard closed for the Commonwealth in an impassioned speech.

Never has so much interest been taken in any case in the County of Buckingham. The courtroom was packed on yesterday and again to-day to suffocation. Judge R. Carter Scott came in for his share of praise for the manner in which he conducted the case and for the swiftness with which he dispatched business.

Doubtless the Buckingham County Courthouse was sweltering in mid-August.

The following day, the Alexandria Gazette elaborated on the closing of the case.

Buckingham, C. H., Va., Aug. 14. — In the Circuit Court here yesterday the jury trying Mott Glover for the murder of young Haynes (sic) brought in a verdict of murder in the second degree and fixed the punishment at eighteen years in the penitentiary.

It is understood that eleven of the jurors agreed to this verdict at first and the other juror stood for murder in the first degree.

This case has attracted widespread interest here, large crowds filling the courthouse each day during the trial. Congressman Flood, engaged for the defense, left to attend to his business in Washington this morning.

Coming Next: Buckingham County Crimes: The Murder of Meade Hanes, Part XXVI

July 1, 2021 / Joanne Yeck

Buckingham County Crimes: The Murder of Meade Hanes, Part XXIV

Need to catch up? Click here to begin the series: Buckingham County Crimes: The Murder of Meade Hanes, Part I

Who was Evie Clyde Holman?

Evie Clyde Holman, born in Buckingham County on October 20, 1897, was the daughter of Virginia Wythe (Eldridge) and Samuel Leake Holman. In 1910, Evie’s parents had been married for nineteen years.

“Ginny” (Eldridge) Holman was the daughter of Eliza (Hanes) and John Rolfe Eldridge, who owned Eldridge Mills, with its associated store and post office, making Evie and Meade Hanes second cousins as well as neighbors.

Though Evie undoubtedly long mourned the death of Meade Hanes, Evie eventually married Houston L. Gary on April 5, 1922.

She died on October 13, 1971 of “acute and chronic respiratory failure” due to “congestive heart failure” at Southside Community Hospital, in Farmville, Virginia. Clyde Gary reported her death.

To learn much more about the Holman family of Virginia, consult the work of Harry S. Holman. Click here to learn more: Buckingham County Genealogy: The Holman Family

Coming Next: Buckingham County Crimes: The Murder of Meade Hanes, Part XXV

June 24, 2021 / Joanne Yeck

The Murder of Meade Hanes: Glover’s Insanity Plea . . . Coincidence or Inspiration?

Evelyn Nesbit

In the summer of 1906, Americans were shocked at what was dubbed the “crime of the century” — millionaire Harry K. Thaw’s cold blooded, public murder of architect Stanford White. Thaw was in a jealous rage over his wife’s previous relationship with White. Mrs. Thaw was the beautiful internationally known celebrity Evelyn Nesbit. Thaw’s insanity plea was successful and he was spared the death sentence.

When the sensational trial filled newspapers across America, Mott Glover would have been about twenty-four years old, could have been engrossed in the crime, and bewitched (as many men were) by Evelyn Nesbit, who was approximately his age.

Did Evie Holman stir thoughts of the famous Evelyn?  Even their names were similar!

Had Mott believed that Thaw was justified in killing White?

Curious about Evelyn Nesbit’s nightclub career and Chicago during the Roaring Twenties? Learn much more about the life of Evelyn Nesbit in my book, The Blackest Sheep: Dan Blanco, Evelyn Nesbit, Gene Harris and Chicago’s Club Alabam, at my author website: Joanne L. Yeck.

June 17, 2021 / Joanne Yeck

Buckingham County Crimes: The Murder of Meade Hanes, Part XXIII

Courtesy Alexandria Gazette.

Need to catch up?

Click here to begin the series: Buckingham County Crimes: The Murder of Meade Hanes, Part I

And so the long-awaited trial began. On August 11, 1913, Evie Clyde Holman calmly took the stand. Perceived to be the “cause” of the death of her neighbor Meade Hanes, she must have felt enormous pressure, still grieving the boy’s death. The Alexandria Gazette reported:

Buckingham, Va., Aug. 11. — In the trial of Mott R. Glover, for the murder of young Meade Haynes (sic), which is now in progress, the most interesting witness today was Miss Evie Clyde Holman, a pretty girl of some fifteen summers, who was admired by the slain youth and by the slayer. Miss Holman made an excellent witness for the prosecution and what she told of having taken place prior to the killing went to show that the accused was very jealous of his rival. Cross-examination failed to shake her testimony in the least.

The commission of insanity experts have pronounced Glover sane at the present time, the effects of the defense seem to be bent on proving him insane at the time he killed young Hanes, and one of the most pathetic sights imaginable was when the defendant’s aged father and mother took the stand and told of things which have taken place in their home life and which they thought tended to show their son of unsound mind.

The accused sits in the courtroom rolling a handkerchief on his knee, smiling occasionally at some amusing happening and at other times in tears at what is being said of him.

The prosecution, having established the fact of the killing, is now trying to prove that jealousy was the cause and that the accused was sane at the time.

Coming Next: Buckingham County Crimes: The Murder of Meade Hanes, Part XXIV

June 10, 2021 / Joanne Yeck

Buckingham County Crimes: The Murder of Meade Hanes, Part XXII

Dr. Albert S. Priddy, 1912.

Need to catch up?

Click here to begin the series: Buckingham County Crimes: The Murder of Meade Hanes, Part I

The Alienists

Mott Glover was examined by at least three psychiatric doctors, all highly regarded in their field.

Dr. William Francis Drewry

Dr. William Francis Drewry (1860-1934) was educated at Randolph-Macon College and the Medical College of Virginia. From 1896-1924, he served as the Superintendent for the Central State Hospital for the insane in Petersburg, Virginia. This institution was exclusively for African Americans and became a model state institution in the South.

His obituary in The American Journal of Insanity (January 1935) called him “a man of the kindliest heart and his actions were activated by human sympathies and deep understanding. He possessed an unhurried logical mind, reaching his conclusions by one firm step after another. He was almost free from prejudices; he was judicial and merciful. When, however, he reached a conclusion he was still courteous, still kindly but unshakable.”

Albert S. Priddy

In 1910-1911, Dr. Albert Priddy became the first superintendent of the Virginia State Colony for Epileptics and Feebleminded in Lynchburg, Virginia. Along with Dr. Joseph Spencer DeJarnette, the long-time director of Western State Hospital in Staunton, Virginia, and attorney Aubrey Strode, Priddy was a proponent of the sterilization of the mentally handicapped, a policy later challenged in the Supreme Court case, Buck v. Bell. Dr. Priddy died in 1926, before the case was heard. Dr. John Bell followed him as superintendent of the Virginia Colony.

For the full story of Buck v. Bell, consult Paul A. Lombardo, Three Generations, No Imbeciles: Eugenics, the Supreme Court, and Buck v. Bell (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2008).

Dr. Beverly R. Tucker

Dr. Beverly Tucker, mentioned in early reports, is likely Dr. Beverly R. Tucker of Richmond who wrote a paper, “Pituitary Disturbance in Relation to the Psychoses of Adolescence” (Journal of the American Medical Association, 1918) and other articles concerning mental illness. He was the head of “The Tucker Sanatorium, Inc.”, located at 102 and 104 East Grace Street in Richmond, Virginia, which later moved within the city to Madison and Franklin streets.

In 1916, Dr. Tucker was described as “well and favorably known to the medical profession, a gentleman of most pleasing personality, a strong and forceful speaker and skilled debater in medical meetings, a teacher of ability, and withal a man largely endowed with that splendid combination of attributes that go to make up the skilled alienist.” (New Charlotte Medical Journal, Vol 71, p. 16)

Coming Next: Buckingham County Crimes: The Murder of Meade Hanes, Part XXIII

June 3, 2021 / Joanne Yeck

Buckingham County Crimes: The Murder of Meade Hanes, Part XXI



Need to catch up? Click here to begin the series: Buckingham County Crimes: The Murder of Meade Hanes, Part I

The case against Mott R. Glover took a shocking turn in early August, 1913. The Times-Dispatch ran a lengthy article under this headline: PHYSICIANS FIND GLOVER WAS SANE.

This was real news, which must have generated a great deal of conversation in Buckingham County. The article opened:

By telegram last night, Sheriff L. H. Kemp, of Henrico, was instructed by Judge R. Carter Scott to bring Mott R. Glover before him immediately in the Buckingham Circuit Court. Sheriff Kemp will leave early this morning with his prisoner, who, pending the report of the commission of lunacy which recently examined into his mental condition has been confined to the Henrico County Jail for safekeeping. The trial will begin to-day.

In the collective opinion of Drs. Beverly Tucker and A. S. Priddy and Dr. Drewry, Glover was sane.

The article went on to report that witnesses had been examined in Buckingham and that the Buckingham court ordered that Glover be arraigned on August 6. Importantly, the article noted that “the report of the commission had not been fully examined by Judge Scott, he notified Sheriff Kemp to keep the prisoner until he was sent for. The lunacy commission was ordered to render a sealed report of its findings, and it was not made public until after Judge Scott entered the order yesterday.”

This was followed by the inevitable recap of the “brutal crime.”

Coming Next: Buckingham County Crimes: The Murder of Meade Hanes, Part XXII

May 27, 2021 / Joanne Yeck

Buckingham County Crimes: The Murder of Meade Hanes, Part XX

Courtesy Times-Dispatch.

Need to catch up? Click here to begin the series: Buckingham County Crimes: The Murder of Meade Hanes, Part I

Finally, on July 25, 1913, Richmond’s Times-Dispatch had something meaty to report about the case against Mott R. Glover. The headline ran: GLOVER BROUGHT TO HENRICO JAIL. The article opened with this update:

In order that the examination into his mental condition can be completed, Mott Robertson Glover, slayer of the sixteen-year-old Meade Hanes, was brought to Henrico County Jail yesterday from Buckingham where he has been incarcerated since the day of the tragedy. Local witnesses were examined by the commission of lunacy on July 16 at Buckingham Courthouse, but it was considered best to bring the accused to the city to make the personal tests.

Glover stands charged with the murder of young Hanes, which was one of the most brutal killings in the annals of Buckingham. The murder occurred May 5, and is said to have been caused by jealousy, it being the general opinion that Glover shot Hanes, whom he considered his rival in love. No other cause of animosity can be discovered.

Hanes together with a farm hand was working on his father’s farm when a man came up on horseback and opened fire on the defenseless youth. Three of five bullets struck the boy and penetrated vital parts. Death was almost instantaneous. Following the shooting Glover rode to Buckingham Courthouse, where he sought out the sheriff and surrendered. Feeling ran high and many threats of violence were made.

Judge Scott Appoints Commission.

Judge R. Carter Scott, of Henrico Circuit Court, was appointed to hold the June term of the Buckingham Circuit Court, and on representation by counsel that their client was insane ordered a commission of lunacy held.…

Glover is said to be indifferent to his fate, but his family has employed the best legal talent available. Among those who appeared for the defense of the first hearing of the commission were Congressman Hal Floyd and Moon & Pitts. Sen. Gayle, who has also been retained, has been seriously ill. Commonwealth’s Attorney Hubard is being assisted in the prosecution by Aubrey E. Strode.

This is the first mention of Moon & Pitts joining the defense. Frank C. Moon, of Lynchburg and Snowden in Buckingham County, is a familiar figure at Slate River Ramblings. Follow this link obituary to read his obituary: Buckingham Notables: Frank C. Moon.

Coming Next: Buckingham County Crimes: The Murder of Meade Hanes, Part XXI

May 20, 2021 / Joanne Yeck

Buckingham County Crimes: The Murder of Meade Hanes, Part XIX

Senator Sands Gayle. Courtesy Wikipedia.

Need to catch up? Click here to begin the series: Buckingham County Crimes: The Murder of Meade Hanes, Part I

In mid-July, A “Commission in Lunacy” was held at Buckingham County’s courthouse to determine the mental condition of Mott Glover. The examiners involved were identified as: Drs. Pirddy, Drewry and Tucker.

On July 13, the Times-Dispatch reported various Buckingham news items, including an update on the hearing:

Buckingham, Va, July 12. — Sen. Sands Gayle has been confined to his home for several weeks by sickness but is much improved.

Dr. L. G. Morris has purchased a new auto and is using it to make the rounds of his country practice.

George W. Patteson of Manteo, enjoyed his trip to Gettysburg to full extent. He met many of his comrades of the Civil War and also made the acquaintance of northern veterans who were exchanging courtesies and hospitable to him.

Mr. and Mrs. Frank Ellis and children, of Alabama, are spending some time in this county.

Buckingham peoples are awaiting with anxiety the action of the State Board of Education in deciding who shall be division superintendent of schools for this county.

Plummer F. Jones, the incumbent, is a candidate for re-election, and is opposed by John A. Tyman, who held the position before Mr. Jones was appointed.

Circuit Court convenes an extra session here on August 6, at which time the commission composed of Drs. Priddy, Tucker and drury (sic) will report to the court their opinion as regards mental condition of Mott R. Glover.

For more about Plummer F. Jones, search the archive at Slate River Ramblings.

Or click here to begin your investigation: Buckingham Notables: The Jones Family of New Store, Part IV

Coming Next: Buckingham County Crimes: The Murder of Meade Hanes, Part XX