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May 13, 2021 / Joanne Yeck

Buckingham County Crimes: The Murder of Meade Hanes, Part XVIII

Dr. Albert S. Priddy, 1912.

Need to catch up? Click here to begin the series: Buckingham County Crimes: The Murder of Meade Hanes, Part I

On June 20, the Times-Dispatch announced that a special court was held in Richmond to assess the sanity of Meade Hanes. The article, sent from Buckingham, began:

Judge R. Carter Scott, of Richmond, opened the special term of the Circuit Court here today and appointed Dr. Drewry, Dr. A. S. Priddy and Dr. Beverly P. (sic) Tucker to inquire into the mental condition of Mott R. Glover, who is charged with the killing of Meade Hanes on May 5. This commission is to report to the Circuit Court of Buckingham on the sixth day of August. If Glover is adjudged sane he will be tried at the August term of court.

These appointed doctors were well-known and influential experts in the field of clinical psychology. Much more to come about their backgrounds and practices.

On June 21, the Daily Press expanded on the story with a report from Dillwyn, running this headline,

TRIAL OF BUCKINGHAM SLAYER IS DELAYED.

The description of Meade Hanes was particularly poignant:

The murder of young Hanes, who was a popular and quiet boy, well beloved by the citizens of the community in which he lived, was considered one of the most brutal crimes that has occurred in Buckingham County in many years.

The article ended by repeating the notion that insane jealousy was the motive for the murder.

Coming Next: Buckingham County Crimes: The Murder of Meade Hanes, Part XIX

May 6, 2021 / Joanne Yeck

Buckingham County Crimes: The Murder of Meade Hanes, Part XVII

Need to catch up? Click here to begin the series: Buckingham County Crimes: The Murder of Meade Hanes, Part I

The June 9, 1913 article printed in Richmond’s Times-Dispatch also capitalized on the strong statewide interest in the upcoming trial of Mott Glover in Maysville (Buckingham Court House).

There is still much interest being manifested in the trial of Mott Glover, which will take place at Buckingham Courthouse on June 19. There are various reports in circulation as to the plea which the accused will make and the defense which his attorneys will bring forward, but it is thought now that the formal plea of insanity will certainly be made. Reports say the prisoner exhibits signs of insanity in his cell in the Buckingham jail, though these reports are not verified by officials. H. D. Flood, Sands Gayle and others will defend Glover, while Attorney Hubard will be assisted in the prosecution by Aubrey E. Stroud, of Lynchburg. The trial will be as largely attended, probably, as any trial ever held in Buckingham County. Judge Hundley’s illness will more than likely prevent his trying the case. If so, the governor will designate another to occupy the bench upon that occasion.

Following this surprising news that Judge Hundley might not hear the case, the article continued, closing with news about the railroad:

There is great dissatisfaction expressed throughout this county on the account of the change in schedule of Chesapeake and Ohio Railroad on its James River division. Mail and passengers now do not reach Arvonia or Dillwyn until late afternoon, though they leave Richmond at 10 A. M. It is thought the railroad company will be asked to allow the morning train to come up the branch line as soon as the morning Richmond train leaves Bremo, not waiting for the Clifton Forge and Lynchburg train, which arrives at 2 o’clock, and is often late. A largely attended meeting, called to protest against the schedule was held at Dillwyn on Thursday of this week.

Beyond the scope of the trial of Mott Glover, from weather to railroads, there was a lot going on in Buckingham County!

Coming Next: Buckingham County Crimes: The Murder of Meade Hanes, Part XVIII

April 29, 2021 / Joanne Yeck

Buckingham County Crimes: The Murder of Meade Hanes, Part XVI

Courtesy Times-Dispatch

Need to catch up? Click here to begin the series: Buckingham County Crimes: The Murder of Meade Hanes, Part I

On June 9, 1913, the Times-Dispatch printed an exceptionally long article about Buckingham County, submitted to the newspaper from Arvonia. It opened by continuing to discuss the current, beneficial weather and a shocking report of a lightning strike at LeSueur’s slate quarry:

The copious and well-distributed rains which have fallen throughout this section within the past two weeks has served to transform all growing crops and bring about conditions most favorable to farming operations. All grass crops have improved more than 100 per cent, and corn is going off well. Both wheat and oats have improved marvelously, the latter crop promising now to be a good one, whereas three weeks ago failure was predicted.

In the progress of a recent thunderstorm of large proportions a tree was struck at LeSueur’s quarry, the thunderbolt passing down the tree into a nearby blacksmith shop, where fifteen or twenty colored hands had congregated for shelter. The lightning struck one of the colored men on the head, tearing his hat to pieces and rendering him unconscious. The other men, though stunned, made a wild scramble for a place of safety, standing not upon the order of their going, but going at once. Property owners attest that some timber was ruined in the process of this flight. The colored man recovered in a few days.

There was also a well-developed cyclone of small proportions at Penlan, near Arvonia, a few days ago, which did considerable damage to timber. The rotary winds, peculiar roar, funnel cloud, and other characteristics of the cyclone were all evident. The matter is now being investigated by the U. S. Weather Bureau.

Coming Next: Buckingham County Crimes: The Murder of Meade Hanes, Part XVII

April 22, 2021 / Joanne Yeck

Buckingham County Crimes: The Murder of Meade Hanes, Part XV

Courtesy Times-Dispatch.

Need to catch up? Click here to begin the series: Buckingham County Crimes: The Murder of Meade Hanes, Part I

 

Despite the excitement over the Glover-Hanes murder case, Richmond’s Times-Dispatch took a slight breather from the story on June 4, 1913, publishing this mundane news. Still, a reference to the crime was slipped in at the end of the article.

CROPS GREATLY IMPROVED.

Conditions in Buckingham Sections Helped by Recent Rains.

[Special to The Times-Dispatch.]

Buckingham, Va. June 3. — The continued wet spell has enabled farmers to get a stand of tobacco, and the wheat, oats and grass crops have greatly improved, but on the lowlands there has been too much water for the corn crops, and they cannot be improved as yet by work.

Ashley Grigg, Jr., who had his leg broken while playing baseball, has been suffering severely since the accident.

The people of Dillwyn are arranging for a fair to be held there this fall. They are paving the sidewalks, and soon the new road from there to this place [Buckingham Court House] is to be built.

The County Farmers’ Union is to meet at this place on the next Saturday, and a special term of the Circuit Court is to be held here beginning June 19, when the case against Mott R. Glover, charged with killing young Meade Hanes, is set for trial.

On June 9, the newspaper expanded about the fair at Dillwyn:

There is much interest taken all over the county in the matter of the fair which will be held at Dillwyn next fall. A monster meeting for boosting purposes will be held at that town on June 18, and committeemen and others from every section of the county will be present to further arrangements for the fair. As Dillwyn is growing so rapidly, and as Buckingham County is improving to such an extent agriculturally, it is thought that this fair will be one of the greatest in every way ever held in this portion of Virginia. Preparations are now being made for and attendance reaching up into the thousands.

Coming Next: Buckingham County Crimes: The Murder of Meade Hanes, Part XVI

April 15, 2021 / Joanne Yeck

Buckingham County Crimes: The Murder of Meade Hanes, Part XIV

Courtesy Daily Press.

 

Need to catch up? Click here to begin the series: Buckingham County Crimes: The Murder of Meade Hanes, Part I

 

On May 21, the Daily Press published the results of the grand jury hearing at Buckingham County’s courthouse. This report came from Dillwyn:

Despite the fact that he pleaded “not guilty” when he was arraigned a few days ago on the charge of murdering his rival in [love], Meade Hanes, 16 years old, it is reported here today that the defense in the case of Mott Robertson Glover, the slayer, will be jealous insanity and every effort will be made by the young man’s lawyers to have alienists examine him before the trial begins.

Glover is reported to have resorted to numerous queer acts since he has been in jail. He seems to realize the enormity of his crime. He is a son of Charles L. Glover, a widely known citizen of the county and is about 30 years old.

Just whether Glover is feigning insanity at present is not yet known. His case is to be called for trial June 19, when it is expected one of the greatest court battles in recent years in Buckingham in behalf of the slayer will begin, as an array of the best legal talent in the state will be here at that time.

Coming Next: Buckingham County Crimes: The Murder of Meade Hanes, Part XV

April 8, 2021 / Joanne Yeck

Buckingham County Crimes: The Murder of Meade Hanes, Part XIII

Courtesy Daily Press.

Need to catch up? Click here to begin the series: Buckingham County Crimes: The Murder of Meade Hanes, Part I

The following day, May 15, the Daily Press revealed more about the response of the Hanes family, letting its readers know that Mott Glover’s case would be heard by a grand jury at Buckingham County courthouse.

According to the Daily Press:

On advice of counsel, the slayer has refrained from discussing the case, further than express penitence for his act, saying he guessed he was in a rather bad fix.

The young victim’s parents collapsed after they heard of the murder of their son, and it was some time before the father could be consoled and prevented from going to the Buckingham county jail in an effort to see Glover. This tragedy is deplored throughout this section of the state. From the best information obtainable it seems that Glover was in a jealous rage when he shot and killed his rival.

The same day, Richmond’s Times-Dispatch printed more details about Glover’s insanity plea, under the headline ALIENISTS MAY BE CALLED TO TESTIFY.

Already there is a change of feeling in progress as regards the punishment that should be meted out to Mott R. Glover, who killed Meade Hanes on May 5, and a number of things are now being told which tend to show that his mind was not right. It is said that Glover bought a bottle of laudanum on the night before the shooting and with a companion who came with him from Miss Holman’s house the same night he talked very strangely. It is thought that he bought the laudanum to take with suicidal intent.

Congressman Floyd, in agreeing to the time which was set for the trial, said counsel wanted time to have alienists summoned here to testify in the case.*

Although Aubrey E. Stroud is employed to assist in the prosecution, it is a noticeable fact that there is no feeling of animosity between the Glover and Hanes families. It is distressing in the extreme to see the great grief of both C. L. Glover and J. B. Hanes, father of the young man who did the killing and of the boy who was killed.

* Alienist is an archaic term for a psychiatrist or psychologist.

Coming Next: Buckingham County Crimes: The Murder of Meade Hanes, Part XIV

April 1, 2021 / Joanne Yeck

Buckingham County Crimes: The Murder of Meade Hanes, Part XII

Courtesy Times-Dispatch.

 

Need to catch up? Click here to begin the series: Buckingham County Crimes: The Murder of Meade Hanes, Part I

 

By May 14, 1913, Richmond’s Times-Dispatch reported news of the upcoming trial of Mott Glover. This headline introduced a short article:

TRIAL OF GLOVER SET FOR JUNE 19

Defense Probably Will Attempt to Show Hanes’s Slayer Insane at the Time of Shooting.

[Special to The Times-Dispatch]

Buckingham, Va. , May 13. — The case against Mott Glover, charged with killing young Meade Hanes on May 5, was called in the Circuit Court here to-day, and June 19 was set for the time of the trial, at which time Judge Hundley will hold a special term of the Circuit Court here.

Congressman Flood and Senator Gayle will appear for the defense, and Commonwealth’s Attorney E. W. Hubard will be assisted in prosecution by Aubrey E. Stroud. It was clear from what was said in court that the defense will try to prove that Mott Glover was insane at the time of the shooting. Congressman Flood and Aubrey E. Stroud were both here to-day.

Judge Hundley, Congressman Flood, Commonwealth’s Attorney E. W. Hubbard, and Aubrey E. Stroud are familiar names at Slate River Ramblings.

Judge George Jefferson Hundley was a key player in “The Famous Forbes Case,” among other criminal trials in Buckingham County. Click here to read his profile: EXTRA: Judge George Jefferson Hundley

Strode, Flood, and E. W. Hubard had long appeared in the Buckingham County Court, including arguing the 1904 arson case against Cliff Wooldridge. To read the entire story, start here: The Famous Forbes Case of Buckingham County: Part I

Click here for a profile of Congressman Flood: Extra: Henry De La Warr “H. D.” Flood (2 September 1865 – 8 December 1921)

Aubrey Ellis Strode defended the men who were accused of murdering the Stewart brothers in 1909. Follow this link for his profile: The 1909 Buckingham Murders: EXTRA # 2

 

Coming Next: Buckingham County Crimes: The Murder of Meade Hanes, Part XIII

 

March 25, 2021 / Joanne Yeck

Buckingham County Crimes: The Murder of Meade Hanes, Part XI

Courtesy Alexandria Gazette.

Need to catch up? Click here to begin the series: Buckingham County Crimes: The Murder of Meade Hanes, Part I

On May 14, 1913, the widely-read Alexandria Gazette reported on the murder in its section “NEWS OF THE OLD DOMINION.” The article came from Farmville and, once again, more details were added to the story of the killing of Meade Hanes. Recapitulation was inevitable, informing readers new to the event. The article began:

Further details of the killing of Meade Hanes, 16 years old, by Mott Robertson Glover, 30 years old, on the farm of the boy’s father, Supervisor J. B. Hanes, near Well Water, Buckingham County, were received here, when it was learned that the slayer hurried to jail to escape injury at the hands of the enraged relatives and friends of the victim.

Glover seems to be of a quiet temperament and has had little to say concerning his crime since he was locked up. Immediately after killing the boy last Monday afternoon, Glover jumped upon his horse and rode as fast as possible to the Buckingham county jail, fearing that he would meet his victim’s father unless he was placed in prison before the meeting of the board of supervisors, which the parent was attending adjourned.

Mr. Hanes was not informed of his son’s tragic death until after Glover was placed in jail. From best information obtainable it seems that Glover killed the boy while suffering from a fit of jealousy. Meade Hanes and the Glover were in love with the same girl. Meade’s love seemed to be reciprocated by the girl.

The slayer is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Charles L. Glover, of Buckingham County, and the nephew of R. G. Glover, of Lynchburg. He spends much of his time in prison smoking cigarette[s] and saying that he regrets his act which has placed him in such a bad plight.

This is the first mention that Mott Glover was pursued by members of the Hanes family. Also, now we understand that the “good roads meeting” previously mentioned in reports was held by the county’s Board of Supervisors, which included J. B. Hanes.

Coming Next: Buckingham County Crimes: The Murder of Meade Hanes, Part XII

March 20, 2021 / Joanne Yeck

Slate River Press Spring Sale

The Pearson Hotel (a.k.a. Maysville Hotel), Spring 1933.

Photo by Francis Benjamin Johnston. Courtesy Library of Congress

Eager to learn more about the history of Buckingham County, Virginia?

“At a Place Called Buckingham,” Volume Two is currently discounted at Braughler Books. Save $5.00. No code necessary. Just click on the hot link above to visit the online bookstore.

This volume is filled with never before published stories concerning the people and places of Buckingham County, including a gallery of images taken in the 1930s by photographer Frances Benjamin Johnston.

The essays are packed with details gleaned from newly discovered county records, contemporary newspaper accounts, and private collections. You’ll meet the proprietors of 19th-century hotels and health resorts, ferry operators, educators, stewards of the poor, planters and their slaves, the hard-working men of the Civilian Conservation Corps, and notables whose influence reached far beyond the county.

Click here to read the Table of Contents: “At a Place Called Buckingham,” Volume Two

 

 

March 18, 2021 / Joanne Yeck

Buckingham County Crimes: The Murder of Meade Hanes, Part X

Courtesy Daily Press.

Need to catch up? Click here to begin the series: Buckingham County Crimes: The Murder of Meade Hanes, Part I

 

The May 10 article in Newport News’ Daily Press, expanded on the relationship between Mott Glover, Meade Hanes, and the girl of their mutual affection, a Miss Holman whose first name was still withheld. It recaps the details of the murder, expanding the story with new details. The article continued:

Young Hanes had been paying attention to a Miss Holman, a pretty and vivacious girl about 16 years old, or possibly younger, when Glover suddenly fell in love with her. Glover became so jealous that he made many efforts to make engagements with the girl, but in almost every instance she showed a preference for young Hanes.

It is reported that Glover had invited the girl to take a ride with him in his buggy about two weeks ago, but she refused saying she had promised to walk with Meade Hanes.

All the while Glover seemed in a jealous frenzy. It was while the boy’s father was attending a good roads meeting at Buckingham Courthouse that the tragedy occurred. Meade Hanes, with the assistance of a hired man, was engaged in plowing and cleaning up a field near his home. While he was cutting down some bushes, his companion saw a man approach on horseback and fire repeatedly at the boy. The boy fell, and his companion saw the man ride away. The hired man ran to notify the family, but the boy was dead before they arrived, three bullets having penetrated his back.

Glover went to Buckingham Courthouse and surrendered to the sheriff. Officers of the court then went to the victim’s father, who was then in the court room and told him his son had been killed.

The Daily Press did not hold back on the motive jealousy, claiming Mott Glover experienced an extended “frenzy” for a period of two weeks. Reported from Farmville, this was likely sensationalism rather than substantiated fact.

Coming Next: Buckingham County Crimes: The Murder of Meade Hanes, Part XI