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September 24, 2020 / Joanne Yeck

Buckingham Female Collegiate Institute 1857, Part III

Buckingham Female Collegiate Institute. Buckingham County, Virginia.

 

Need to catch up?  Click here: Buckingham Female Collegiate Institute 1857, Part I

The voyage on the packet boat from Richmond to New Canton, Buckingham County was apparently uneventful since Caroline wrote little of it. The next entry in her journal reads:

Tuesday, 7th July, 1857

The weather is quite pleasant, arrived at New Canton about nine o’clk. Had to wait there some time for the stage; arrived at the Institute at 1 o’clk. Bake was delighted to see us, carried her a jar of new pickles, which she was equally pleased with. Found her in excellent health & spirits & eagerly watching the arrival of every vehicle & at last the old stage came jagging along & she ran out to meet us.

The following day, Caroline wrote this comment — too brief for those of us hungry for details about life at Buckingham Female Collegiate Institute!

Wednesday, 8th of July, 1857

Another pleasant day. The performers commenced at ten o’clk & acted their parts admirably well. – – The essays were very beautiful. Adjourned little after one o’clk till 8 in the afternoon.

~

Click here for a biography of Caroline Baker “Bake” Littlepage: Caroline B. (Bake) Littlepage

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To learn more about life at Buckingham Female Collegiate Institute, search the archives at Slate River Ramblings and enjoy the results!

Don’t know where to start? Begin here: Buckingham Female Collegiate Institute: A Reminiscence

Coming Next: Buckingham Female Collegiate Institute 1857, Part IV

September 17, 2020 / Joanne Yeck

Buckingham Female Collegiate Institute 1857, Part II

Caroline Baker (Ellett) Littlepage with Lucy Littlepage, by John Toole (1815-1860).

Courtesy Louise Eichhorn Schroede and Virginia Historical Society.

 

Need to catch up?  Click here: Buckingham Female Collegiate Institute 1857, Part I

On July 5, 1857, Caroline Littlepage continued preparations to depart for Buckingham County and the Female Institute. Daughters Pigeo & Nannie were sent to stay with their Aunt Rose while Caroline was away from Woodbury. Still torn about leaving, Caroline wrote, “I feel quite sad at parting with them.”

The following day, she finally left for Buckingham County, writing:

Monday, 6th July, 1857

We have an early breakfast & the Maj. [Caroline’s husband] accompanies Hardie & myself to the C.H. to take the Stage to Richmond. Mary, Hardie & myself left about eight o’clk, had quite a nice time going over the day being so pleasant. Arrived in Richmond about five or four o’clk. Saw Mr. Wilson & ordered some groceries, then purchased a hat for Baker & took the packet boat, little before five, boat very much crowded. Mrs. Dick refused to give me that back seat in the Stage, very much to the chagrin of Mr. Northern.

Caroline’s traveling companions were her son, Hardin Beverly Littlepage, and her eldest daughter, Mary, who does not continue with them to Buckingham County.

Bibb Edwards wrote this about “Hardie”:

Lewis and Caroline called him Hardie. Probably named for his deceased paternal grandfather, Hardin Beverly Littlepage was born 8 March 1841. The seventh of their children and the fifth son, Lewis and Caroline probably chose his nickname to distinguish him from the other nearby Hardin Littlepages. Captain Hardin Littlepage (1810-1879), Lewis’ brother, lived next door at Aspen Grove. Hardin Benskin Littlepage (1827-1860), son of Lewis’ brother Edmund, was raised at adjacent Retreat, but would move to Montgomery, Alabama in the late 1850s. . . .

[In the mid-1850s, Hardie] goes to school, attends church, runs errands, has a pet squirrel, helps his father, visits with friends and family. At twelve Hardie’s family had no way of predicting his exceptional future.

Click here for a full biography of Hardin Beverly Littlepage.

Learn about other members of the Littlepage family here: 1855 Lewis Littlepages

Coming next: Buckingham Female Collegiate Institute 1857, Part III

September 10, 2020 / Joanne Yeck

Buckingham Female Collegiate Institute 1857, Part I

Caroline’s Journal, 1855-1858. Courtesy Bibb Edwards.

In September 2019, Slate River Ramblings ran a series about Caroline Littlepage’s 1856 visit to Buckingham Female Collegiate Institute where her daughter, “Bake,” was a student.

To read about that trip to Buckingham, click here: Buckingham Female Collegiate Institute 1856, Part I

For those of you not familiar with Caroline’s Journal, since 2014, Bibb Edwards has been posting Caroline’s almost daily journal entries from the mid-19th century. The first post was written on June 11, 1864, 150 years earlier to the day. After concluding her Civil War-era journals, Bibb began posting what survives from Caroline’s journals from 1855, 1856 and, currently, 1857.

Click here to learn more about Caroline Baker (Ellett) Littlepage of Woodbury in King William County, Virginia: Caroline’s Journal

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In 1857, Baker “Bake” Littlepage returned to Buckingham County to study at Buckingham Female Collegiate Institute. On July 1, her mother, Caroline, began preparing for a trip to Buckingham to attend the commencement exercises and wrote the following in her journal:

I feel so sad at the idea of leaving [daughters] Nannie & [Pigeo] that it is almost with reluctance that I am trying to make preparation for my departure. Tho’ I am so anxious to make the trip to see the other children, & Bake will be so much delighted to see me I know.

Caroline was particularly concerned about Pigeo’s health and, on July 3, wrote:

Commenced packing my trunk this evening but feel so melancholly (sic) at the idea of the dear little children, that I hardly knew what I am about. I almost wish I had never thought of going.

There were many schools located closer to Woodbury available to the Littlepage family. Sending Bake all the way to Buckingham County is a testament to the quality and reputation of Buckingham Female Collegiate Institute.

Coming next: Buckingham Female Collegiate Institute 1857, Part II

September 3, 2020 / Joanne Yeck

Buckingham County Mystery: Buckingham Literary Society

Monticello’s Book Room. Courtesy Jefferson Library and Monticello.

Recently, Slate River Ramblings reader Jeremy Winfrey discovered the following Buckingham County tidbit. . . .

Beginning in 1871, three acres of land in Buckingham County, were owned by the Buckingham Literary Society and taxed to the trustees which included my cousin, Thomas Meredith Agee.  G. W. Baber & others are also listed as trustees of the Society. By 1900, the land was listed in the tax books as “T M Agee (L. society)”.

The small tract was located near “Sharon” – probably Sharon Baptist Church.  Jeremy believes the three acres were located in the vicinity of routes 671, 622, and 651.

 

Does a Slate River Ramblings reader recognize the Buckingham Literary Society?

Was it connected to Buckingham Literary Academy?  Click here to learn more about it:

Buckingham Literary Academy, Part I

August 27, 2020 / Joanne Yeck

 Buckingham County: Fight Against Smallpox

 

Early in the 19th century, hopes ran high that a successful inoculation for smallpox had been developed.

During 1801 and 1802, President Thomas Jefferson took a keen interest in the “vaccine.” During this period, Jefferson treated the community at Monticello and, in 1801, he inoculated his niece, Nancy, Randolph Jefferson’s daughter. If you’d like to learn more, consult the article, “Inoculation,” Monticello’s Thomas Jefferson Encyclopedia.

Recently, Slate River Ramblings reader Roger Ward sent information about smallpox inoculations in Buckingham County. In the front of the Surveyor’s Plat Book, 1783-1799, which survived the courthouse fire in 1869, there is a note, dated June 5, 1802, written by surveyor John Patteson which indicates that he “treated” the following members of his family: Polley, Judith, David, Nelson, Jack, and Thomas N. [?] Patteson.  He also inoculated his “Negroes”: Olive, Billy, Big Dick, little Dick, Dirender [?], Dice [?], Sillar [?], Rose, Agge, Cabe, Peter, little Frank, Simon, Ester, little Polley, and David.

To learn more about 19th-century medical advances in Buckingham County, click here:

Buckingham County: Cow-Pox

Buckingham Notables: Dr. James Walker

August 20, 2020 / Joanne Yeck

The Foland Family of Scottsville: Part VI

Methodist Episcopal Church. Bluefield, West Virginia.

 

Need to catch up? Click here: The Foland Family of Scottsville: Part I

The life story of Clarke Valentine Foland, written by James Morton Callahan, concludes:

Soon after he came to Bluefield Mr. Foland was a clerk in the post office in 1901, under Dr. J. B. Martin, then Postmaster, and again in 1904 he served for a time in the local office. Mr. Foland has a gift of music, has developed much skill with the violin, and for several years was choir director of the Grace Methodist Episcopal Church, South. The church organist at that time was Miss Ethel Irene Stovall. This common interest in music culminated in their marriage on December 4, 1912. Mrs. Foland is a daughter of William A. and Hattie Stovall. Her father was formally a schoolteacher, was a conductor on the Norfolk & Western Railroad, and still later in business in Bluefield. Mrs. Foland is a graduate of the Concorde State Normal of Athens, West Virginia, graduated in music at Centenary College in Cleveland, Tennessee, and finished her musical studies in the school of music and arts in New York City. Her special field of proficiency is the piano, and since her marriage she has also continued teaching and musical interests in general. They are now members of the Bland St., Methodist Episcopal Church, South, and Mr. Foland is a steward in the church and a member of the choir. Fraternally he is a senior counselor of the United Commercial Travelers of America, is a past sachem of the Improved Order of Red Men, is a Royal Arch and Knight Templar Mason, being generalissimo of the latter, and is a member of the Shrine at Charleston. He belongs to the Bluefield Chamber of Commerce and Rotary Club.

Clarke Valentine Foland was certainly a joiner! His gift of music and his marriage to the very accomplished Ethel Irene Stovall is a revelation. Musical talent ran in the Foland family. His ancestor, Randolph Jefferson, played the violin, as did Randolph’s brother, Thomas.

Learn more about the Foland family in my book, Peter Field Jefferson: Dark Prince of Scottsville & Lost Jeffersons.

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Many thanks to Bill Kelcey for sharing information about the Foland family of Scottsville. His ancestors include: Randolph Jefferson, Peter Field Jefferson, and Peter Valentine Foland’s son, James Gates Foland. Mr. Kelcey also shared that James Gates Foland’s son, Calvin Foland, was particularly interested in the family history and, over the years, made visits home to Mount Walla.

August 13, 2020 / Joanne Yeck

The Foland Family of Scottsville: Part V

Foland Printing Co. Bluefield, West Virginia.

 

Need to catch up?  Click here: The Foland Family of Scottsville: Part I

 

According to James Morton Callahan’s biography of Clarke Valentine Foland, this Jefferson descendant was a printer, working for newspapers across Virginia until he finally settled in Bluefield, West Virginia. His life story continues:

Clarke V. Foland spent his early life at Scottsville, where he attended school, and was also a student in the Virginia Polytechnic Institute at Blacksburg. In May, 1898, he volunteered for service in the Spanish-American war, being assigned to duty in the Blacksburg Band, and was with Gen. Fitzhugh Lee’s command at Jacksonville, Florida. He was mustered out at Salem, Virginia, in December, 1898.

He learned the printer’s trade in the office of the Scottsville Courier, and later was employed in various capacities on the Buchanan, Virginia, Banner, the Fincastle Herald, the Norton Free Press, the Tazewell Republican, and finally on the Bluefield Evening Leader. He was a part owner of the Leader when it suspended publication, and he lost all his savings at that time. In February, 1909, he organized the Foland Printing Company, which took over the very limited equipment of the old Leader. He became president of the new organization, which had a cash capital of only $65.00. For a dozen years, Mr. Foland kept the business growing to the limit of its facilities, and now has a complete commercial printing establishment, handling a large part of the printing business in this section of the state.

Coming Next: The Foland Family of Scottsville: Part VI

August 6, 2020 / Joanne Yeck

The Foland Family of Scottsville: Part IV

Mount Walla, Scottsville, Virginia. Courtesy Virginia Department of Historic Resources.

Need to catch up? Click here: The Foland Family of Scottsville: Part I

James Morton Callahan’s biography of Clarke Valentine Foland continues:

Peter V. Foland married Elizabeth Clarke Stratton, who was born in Scottsville and died in March 1921, at the age of 75. She was the daughter of James and Harriet (Wood) Stratton, of Fluvanna County, Virginia Harriet Wood was the daughter of Thomas Wood of that county. Through his father Clarke V. Foland is a descendent of Randolph Jefferson, the only brother of Thomas Jefferson, sons of Peter Jefferson. James Stratton, his maternal grandfather, was a veteran of the Mexican War. Clarke V. Foland was next to the youngest in a family of seven children. His brother James G. is a machinist at Hendricks, West Virginia.

Harriet (Wood) Stratton was born about 1810-1815. Was her father, Thomas Wood of Fluvanna County, the same Thomas Wood who was the father of Elizabeth A. Wood, who married Peter Field Jefferson, Jr.?

Elizabeth A. (Wood) Jefferson was born about 1816-1818 and her sister Cynthia (Wood) Singer was born about 1825. They are the right ages to be sisters to Harriet. If this is the case, Bettie Stratton and Peter Foland were related by marriage.

In 1875, Harriet (Wood) Stratton gave a deposition concerning Peter’s grandfather, Peter Field Jefferson. At the time Harriet was sixty-six years old and lived with the Folands at Mount Walla. She testified that she had known Peter Field Jefferson all of her life. This would doubtless be true if she were his son’s sister-in-law.

This direct connection to the Wood family also helps explain Maria (Singer) Ellis’ close connection to the Foland home at Mount Walla.  If Harriet (Wood) Stratton was the sister of Cynthia (Wood) Singer, Maria was her niece and first cousin to Bettie (Stratton) Foland.  Maria died at Mount Walla in 1942, age ninety-eight.

Can a Slate River Ramblings reader shed any more light on the Wood family of Fluvanna County?

Coming Next: The Foland Family of Scottsville: Part V

July 30, 2020 / Joanne Yeck

The Foland Family of Scottsville: Part III

Peter V. Foland, Prisoner of War.

 

Need to catch up? Click here: The Foland Family of Scottsville: Part I

~

Thanks to James Morton Callahan’s biography of Clarke Valentine Foland in The History of West Virginia, Old and New, Volume 2, I have re-examined Peter V. Foland’s military service during the Civil War.

On October 19, 1861, Peter claimed he was seventeen years old when he enlisted for twelve months of service in Company G of the 43rd Tennessee Volunteers. These were Confederate troops. Click here to see the battles they fought in:

CONFEDERATE TENNESSEE TROOPS: 43rd Regiment, Tennessee Infantry (Gillespie’s) (5th East Tennessee Volunteers)

He was discharged on November 17, 1862.

On September 15, 1863, at Panther Springs, Tennessee, Peter reenlisted for a term of three years. This time he joined the 9th Regiment, Tennessee Cavalry, which apparently fought for the Union.  Click here to see the battles they fought in:

UNION TENNESSEE VOLUNTEERS: 9th Regiment, Tennessee Cavalry

In October, he was charged with desertion. In 1885, this charge was removed from his record.

Then, on February 5, 1864, he was captured by the Union Army and was a prisoner of war held in several places, including Camp Chase in Columbus Ohio.

The obvious question is . . . As a member of the 9th Regiment, fighting for the Union, why was Foland held as a prisoner?

Was he imprisoned for desertion? Was he a Confederate spy? Can a Slate River Ramblings reader offer another explanation for his imprisonment?

Also, if Peter V. Foland did fight for the Union, was this fact known when he settled in Scottsville, Virginia, married a local girl, and became a town leader?

Coming next: The Foland Family of Scottsville: Part IV

July 23, 2020 / Joanne Yeck

The Foland Family of Scottsville: Part II

Peter Valentine Foland, gravestone. Photo by Joanne Yeck.

 

Need to catch up?  Click here: The Foland Family of Scottsville: Part I

 

In The History of West Virginia, Old and New, Volume 2, author James Morton Callahan included a biography of Clarke Valentine Foland. The entry continues with information about his father, Peter Valentine Foland:

Peter Valentine Foland, father of the Bluefield businessman, was born in Richmond, Virginia. And during the last two years of the Civil War served as a Union soldier. He was once captured, and spent part of part of his time as a prisoner of war. He was a carpenter by trade, and his home for half a century was at Scottsville, where he died in July, 1915, at the age of 70. He was a Democrat, served as a member of the [Town] Council, and also was mayor of Scottsville, was a steward in the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, and for 30 years was superintendent of the Sunday school.

Sources vary as to whether Peter Valentine Foland was born in Richmond or Scott County, Virginia. Born on January 22, 1845, the Foland family may have already been on their way west to Tennessee.

Likewise, Foland’s military service during the Civil War is up for discussion. Confederate records show that he enlisted in the fall of 1861, joining Company G of the 43rd Tennessee Volunteers. There are records substantiating that he was a prisoner of war and that he was discharged on November 17, 1862. On September 15, 1863, he joined 9th Regiment, Tennessee Cavalry, which fought for the Union.

Click here to read my initial interpretation of his service:

Peter V. Foland, Part II

Peter V. Foland, Part III

The National Archives’ database for soldiers contains the following entries for Peter V. Foland:

Peter V. Foland, 9th Regiment Tennessee Cavalry, Union

Peter V. Foland, 43rd Regiment Tennessee Infantry, Confederacy

Peter V. “Folding,” 43rd Regiment Tennessee Infantry, Confederacy (Gillespie’s) (5th East Tennessee Volunteers)

Peter V. Folen, 43rd Regiment Tennessee Infantry, Confederacy (Gillespie’s) (5th East Tennessee Volunteers)

Years later, Peter Foland would apply for a pension based on his service in the 9th Regiment, Tennessee Cavalry and his widow would apply for a pension in 1915.

Coming next: The Foland Family of Scottsville: Part III