Skip to content
April 1, 2021 / Joanne Yeck

Buckingham County Crimes: The Murder of Meade Hanes, Part XII

Courtesy Times-Dispatch.

 

Need to catch up? Click here to begin the series: Buckingham County Crimes: The Murder of Meade Hanes, Part I

 

By May 14, 1913, Richmond’s Times-Dispatch reported news of the upcoming trial of Mott Glover. This headline introduced a short article:

TRIAL OF GLOVER SET FOR JUNE 19

Defense Probably Will Attempt to Show Hanes’s Slayer Insane at the Time of Shooting.

[Special to The Times-Dispatch]

Buckingham, Va. , May 13. — The case against Mott Glover, charged with killing young Meade Hanes on May 5, was called in the Circuit Court here to-day, and June 19 was set for the time of the trial, at which time Judge Hundley will hold a special term of the Circuit Court here.

Congressman Flood and Senator Gayle will appear for the defense, and Commonwealth’s Attorney E. W. Hubard will be assisted in prosecution by Aubrey E. Stroud. It was clear from what was said in court that the defense will try to prove that Mott Glover was insane at the time of the shooting. Congressman Flood and Aubrey E. Stroud were both here to-day.

Judge Hundley, Congressman Flood, Commonwealth’s Attorney E. W. Hubbard, and Aubrey E. Stroud are familiar names at Slate River Ramblings.

Judge George Jefferson Hundley was a key player in “The Famous Forbes Case,” among other criminal trials in Buckingham County. Click here to read his profile: EXTRA: Judge George Jefferson Hundley

Strode, Flood, and E. W. Hubard had long appeared in the Buckingham County Court, including arguing the 1904 arson case against Cliff Wooldridge. To read the entire story, start here: The Famous Forbes Case of Buckingham County: Part I

Click here for a profile of Congressman Flood: Extra: Henry De La Warr “H. D.” Flood (2 September 1865 – 8 December 1921)

Aubrey Ellis Strode defended the men who were accused of murdering the Stewart brothers in 1909. Follow this link for his profile: The 1909 Buckingham Murders: EXTRA # 2

 

Coming Next: Buckingham County Crimes: The Murder of Meade Hanes, Part XIII

 

March 25, 2021 / Joanne Yeck

Buckingham County Crimes: The Murder of Meade Hanes, Part XI

Courtesy Alexandria Gazette.

Need to catch up? Click here to begin the series: Buckingham County Crimes: The Murder of Meade Hanes, Part I

On May 14, 1913, the widely-read Alexandria Gazette reported on the murder in its section “NEWS OF THE OLD DOMINION.” The article came from Farmville and, once again, more details were added to the story of the killing of Meade Hanes. Recapitulation was inevitable, informing readers new to the event. The article began:

Further details of the killing of Meade Hanes, 16 years old, by Mott Robertson Glover, 30 years old, on the farm of the boy’s father, Supervisor J. B. Hanes, near Well Water, Buckingham County, were received here, when it was learned that the slayer hurried to jail to escape injury at the hands of the enraged relatives and friends of the victim.

Glover seems to be of a quiet temperament and has had little to say concerning his crime since he was locked up. Immediately after killing the boy last Monday afternoon, Glover jumped upon his horse and rode as fast as possible to the Buckingham county jail, fearing that he would meet his victim’s father unless he was placed in prison before the meeting of the board of supervisors, which the parent was attending adjourned.

Mr. Hanes was not informed of his son’s tragic death until after Glover was placed in jail. From best information obtainable it seems that Glover killed the boy while suffering from a fit of jealousy. Meade Hanes and the Glover were in love with the same girl. Meade’s love seemed to be reciprocated by the girl.

The slayer is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Charles L. Glover, of Buckingham County, and the nephew of R. G. Glover, of Lynchburg. He spends much of his time in prison smoking cigarette[s] and saying that he regrets his act which has placed him in such a bad plight.

This is the first mention that Mott Glover was pursued by members of the Hanes family. Also, now we understand that the “good roads meeting” previously mentioned in reports was held by the county’s Board of Supervisors, which included J. B. Hanes.

Coming Next: Buckingham County Crimes: The Murder of Meade Hanes, Part XII

March 20, 2021 / Joanne Yeck

Slate River Press Spring Sale

The Pearson Hotel (a.k.a. Maysville Hotel), Spring 1933.

Photo by Francis Benjamin Johnston. Courtesy Library of Congress

Eager to learn more about the history of Buckingham County, Virginia?

“At a Place Called Buckingham,” Volume Two is currently discounted at Braughler Books. Save $5.00. No code necessary. Just click on the hot link above to visit the online bookstore.

This volume is filled with never before published stories concerning the people and places of Buckingham County, including a gallery of images taken in the 1930s by photographer Frances Benjamin Johnston.

The essays are packed with details gleaned from newly discovered county records, contemporary newspaper accounts, and private collections. You’ll meet the proprietors of 19th-century hotels and health resorts, ferry operators, educators, stewards of the poor, planters and their slaves, the hard-working men of the Civilian Conservation Corps, and notables whose influence reached far beyond the county.

Click here to read the Table of Contents: “At a Place Called Buckingham,” Volume Two

 

 

March 18, 2021 / Joanne Yeck

Buckingham County Crimes: The Murder of Meade Hanes, Part X

Courtesy Daily Press.

Need to catch up? Click here to begin the series: Buckingham County Crimes: The Murder of Meade Hanes, Part I

 

The May 10 article in Newport News’ Daily Press, expanded on the relationship between Mott Glover, Meade Hanes, and the girl of their mutual affection, a Miss Holman whose first name was still withheld. It recaps the details of the murder, expanding the story with new details. The article continued:

Young Hanes had been paying attention to a Miss Holman, a pretty and vivacious girl about 16 years old, or possibly younger, when Glover suddenly fell in love with her. Glover became so jealous that he made many efforts to make engagements with the girl, but in almost every instance she showed a preference for young Hanes.

It is reported that Glover had invited the girl to take a ride with him in his buggy about two weeks ago, but she refused saying she had promised to walk with Meade Hanes.

All the while Glover seemed in a jealous frenzy. It was while the boy’s father was attending a good roads meeting at Buckingham Courthouse that the tragedy occurred. Meade Hanes, with the assistance of a hired man, was engaged in plowing and cleaning up a field near his home. While he was cutting down some bushes, his companion saw a man approach on horseback and fire repeatedly at the boy. The boy fell, and his companion saw the man ride away. The hired man ran to notify the family, but the boy was dead before they arrived, three bullets having penetrated his back.

Glover went to Buckingham Courthouse and surrendered to the sheriff. Officers of the court then went to the victim’s father, who was then in the court room and told him his son had been killed.

The Daily Press did not hold back on the motive jealousy, claiming Mott Glover experienced an extended “frenzy” for a period of two weeks. Reported from Farmville, this was likely sensationalism rather than substantiated fact.

Coming Next: Buckingham County Crimes: The Murder of Meade Hanes, Part XI

March 11, 2021 / Joanne Yeck

Buckingham County Crimes: The Murder of Meade Hanes, Part IX

 

Need to catch up? Click here to begin the series: Buckingham County Crimes: The Murder of Meade Hanes, Part I

 

The death of Meade Hanes was widely reported, in part, likely due to the sensational facts of the murder. On May 10, Newport News’ Daily Press ran a lengthy article updating their readers concerning the shocking murder. It began:

FARMVILLE, VA., May 9. — Mott R. Glover, about 30 years old, who shot and killed his rival in love, Meade Hanes, a boy about 16 years old, has shown great regret since he was landed in the Buckingham county jail to await trial on the charge of murder. He is reported today to have expressed sorrow for his act, but does not discuss the details of the tragedy, which is generally deplored throughout the section of the state, both the Glover and Hanes families being prominent and widely known.

The murder occurred Monday on the farm of the boy’s father, Blackwell Hanes, of Well Water, and the victim’s funeral took place, Tuesday afternoon, scores of citizens from Well Water, Glenmore, Diana Mills, Gilliamsville and Arvonia attended the obsequies.

Interested in learning more about the Buckingham County communities listed here? Search the archives at Slate River Ramblings and enjoy the results!

Coming Next: Buckingham County Crimes: The Murder of Meade Hanes, Part X

March 4, 2021 / Joanne Yeck

Buckingham County Crimes: The Murder of Meade Hanes, Part VIII

 

Need to catch up? Click here to begin the series: Buckingham County Crimes: The Murder of Meade Hanes, Part I

 

The May 7 article in Richmond’s Times-Dispatch concerning the murder of Meade Hanes reminded readers of the trial of Cliff Wooldridge which had taken place in Buckingham County in 1904-1905.

In 2016, this trial was reported at Slate River Ramblings in a series entitled “The Famous Forbes Case of Buckingham County.” The opening post began:

During 1904 and 1905, a mysterious case of arson, tried in the Buckingham County and Prince Edward courts, fascinated the citizens of both places for many months. Readers of Richmond’s The Times-Dispatch, The Farmville Herald, and the Appomattox and Buckingham Times reveled in the details of Buckingham’s elite and their handsome sons and pretty daughters. While it apparently did not become national news, readers in Baltimore and Washington D.C. also followed this mysterious crime story.

Unlike the serial crimes committed by “The Buckingham Outlaws,” who terrorized the good people of Arvonia in 1908, or the murders of the reclusive Stewart brothers in 1910, this crime involved prominent Buckingham families, both as victims and as alleged perpetrators.

While the trials of The Buckingham Outlaws and the men charged with the murder of the Stewart brothers suggested possible irregularities in Buckingham County’s justice system, the crime that came to be called “The Famous Forbes Case,” reveals the machinations among men of power. This is no backwoods clan fight. This story suggests white collar enmity, fueled by long-standing grudges among families.

The great legal minds of central Virginia once again take the stage. Buckingham County’s Commonwealth’s Attorney Edmund W. Hubard headed the prosecution, aided by Lynchburg’s Aubrey E. Strode. The defense was primarily in the hands of Congressman H. D. Flood.

The story opens on March 9, 1904 when The Times-Dispatch reported two fires in Buckingham County, one at White Hall (Dillwyn) where the burning of the R.M. Anderson Company threatened the town and one at the farm of Mr. John Forbes. . . .

Intrigued? You can find the series in the archives at Slate River Ramblings. Click here to begin the reading story: The Famous Forbes Case of Buckingham County: Part I

Coming Next: Buckingham County Crimes: The Murder of Meade Hanes, Part IX

February 25, 2021 / Joanne Yeck

Buckingham County Crimes: The Murder of Meade Hanes, Part VII

Senator Sands Gayle. Courtesy Find A Grave.

 

Need to catch up? Click here to begin the series: Buckingham County Crimes: The Murder of Meade Hanes, Part I

 

Who was Senator Sands Gayle?

Soon after the murder of Meade Hanes, Senator Sands Gayle was announced as the Glover family’s choice to defend their son, Mott.

According to Wikipedia, Sands Gayle (13 February 1870 – 21 December 1918) was a lawyer and Democratic politician who served in the Virginia Senate, representing the 18th district, from 4 January 1905 – 9 January 1907. His entry includes this biographical information:

Born in Hanover County, Virginia, the son of Confederate veteran Mordecai Gayle and his wife, the former Virginia Broaddus, he graduated from Richmond College (now the University of Richmond) in 1897.

He practiced law in North Carolina and served in the North Carolina legislature before moving his legal practice to Buckingham County, Virginia. Active in the local Democratic party (that became the Byrd Organization after his death), he won election and re-election to the state senate in a district that included Appomattox, Buckingham, Fluvanna and Charlotte Counties. He died in office after an illness of about two months] and Samuel Lewis Ferguson replaced him in the 1919 extra session and also won re-election.

In 1910, Sands Gayle (age 40) lived in Buckingham County’s Maysville District with his wife, Sara B. (age 30), and the daughters, Elizabeth B. (age 7) and Laura F. (age 3). Included in the household was Mary Brown (age 25), an African-American servant.

Senator Gayle is buried in Riverview Cemetery in Richmond, Virginia. Learn more at Find-A-Grave: Sands Gayle.

If a Slate River Ramblings reader knows what brought Sands Gayle to Buckingham County, please comment.

Coming Next: Buckingham County Crimes: The Murder of Meade Hanes, Part VIII

February 18, 2021 / Joanne Yeck

Buckingham County Crimes: The Murder of Meade Hanes, Part VI

 

Need to catch up? Click here to begin the series: Buckingham County Crimes: The Murder of Meade Hanes, Part I

 

The initial reports of the murder of Meade Hanes stressed the prominence of both families involved. The May 7, 1913 issue of Richmond’s Times-Dispatch contained this about the Glover and Hanes families:

Charles L. Glover, father of the slayer of young Hanes, is a man of the highest type. His children have married into some of the most prominent families in the county. Both the mother and father of the dead boy have far-reaching family connections, all prominent and most respectable.

The tragedy has cast a gloom over the entire county, every citizen expressing the greatest sympathy with both families in their troubles.

The matter will undoubtedly be taken up at the May term of the Buckingham court, and the day then set for the commencement of the trial. It is probable that the trial will be the most memorable and important one held in the county since the Wooldridge trial of nine years ago. As the connections of Glover are wealthy, it is expected that the best counsel in Virginia will be employed to defend him.

More coming soon about the trial of Cliff Wooldridge. This mysterious case concerning arson stretched from 1904-1905, captivating the citizens of Buckingham County.

Coming Next: Buckingham County Crimes: The Murder of Meade Hanes, Part VII

February 11, 2021 / Joanne Yeck

Buckingham County Crimes: The Murder of Meade Hanes, Part V

Buckingham County Courthouse, 1914, before the concrete fence was proposed.

Courtesy Small Special Collections, University of Virginia.

 

Need to catch up? Click here to begin the series: Buckingham County Crimes: The Murder of Meade Hanes, Part I

 

The article printed in Richmond’s Times-Dispatch on May 7, 1913 continued as follows:

Yesterday, while Blackwell Hanes, the boy’s father, was at Buckingham Courthouse attending a good roads meeting, young Meade Hanes, with the assistance of a hired man, was engaged in plowing and cleaning up a field near his home. While he with a mattock was cutting down some bushes his companion with the plow saw a man approach on horseback and fire repeatedly at the boy. The boy fell, and his companion saw the man ride off. He immediately ran to notify the family, but when they arrived the boy was dead, or died within a few minutes thereafter. Three of the five shots took effect in the boy’s back, piercing his vital organs.

Mott Glover then deliberately rode to Buckingham Courthouse, where a large number of the County citizens were gathered, and he gave himself up to the sheriff, saying he had killed a man. Blackwell Hanes, the father, was at the time in the courtroom listening to a good roads speech, and when he was taken aside and told of the horrible tragedy he collapsed and had to be carried to his buggy and driven home.

No motive whatever is known for the murder except jealousy on the part of Mott Glover. It is reported that he has already employed Senator Sands Gayle as counsel, and will also employ an array of counsel for his defense.

Both families stand high in the county they have wide connections on every side, and there are hundreds of near kinsman of the families in the county and adjoining counties.

Later reports will vary little from this early version.

Coming Next: Buckingham County Crimes: The Murder of Meade Hanes, Part VI

February 4, 2021 / Joanne Yeck

Buckingham County Crimes: The Murder of Meade Hanes, Part IV

Richmond Times-Dispatch, 7 May 1913.

 

Need to catch up? Click here to begin the series: Buckingham County Crimes: The Murder of Meade Hanes, Part I

 

By May 7, Richmond’s Times-Dispatch published a much fuller version of the unfolding story under the headline “No Known Motive Except Jealousy: Killing of Young Meade Hanes by Mott R. Glover Stirs Buckingham County.” Sent from Arvonia on May 6, the substantial article began:

The funeral of young Meade Hanes, son of Blackwell Hanes, who was shot dead yesterday by Mott Robertson Glover, was held at the home of his father this afternoon at 4 o’clock, a large number of people flocking to the funeral from various sections of the county to offer sympathy to the stricken parents.

The tragedy was one of the most remarkable ever heard of in the section of Virginia. The whole matter was fully ventilated over the various telephone lines of the county last night, and it appears that the details are about as follows: Young Meade Hanes, though a boy of about fifteen or sixteen years of age, was paying boyish attentions to a young woman, a near neighbor, about his age, or possibly younger. His rival, if he could be said to have a rival, was Mott Robertson Glover, of Well Water, Buckingham County, a man in the neighborhood of thirty years of age. It is told here that Glover had invited the young girl to ride with him in his buggy a few weeks ago, but that she refused, saying she had promised to walk with young Meade Hanes. Later she again showed preference for young Hanes. That is all that can possibly be gathered at this time any difficulty which might have existed between the two men.

Interestingly, it will be some time before the name of the “young woman” was revealed. Was the correspondent protecting the family? After all, this might have been simply a rumor.

Coming Next: Buckingham County Crimes: The Murder of Meade Hanes, Part V