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October 22, 2018 / Joanne Yeck

Buckingham County’s Poor, 1805-1820: Part V

LDS Family History Center. Charlottesville, Virginia.

To my surprise, Part V of “Buckingham County’s Poor, 1805-1820” failed to post.  Here it is. Better late than never!

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Roger G. Ward has abstracted images from the Buckingham County Virginia Loose Papers available at PCs located at LDS Family History Centers. Be sure to read to the end of the series where there will be a link to a PDF with his complete document.

Click here to catch up:

Buckingham County’s Poor, 1805-1820: Part I

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In the early nineteenth century, poor women abounded in Buckingham County. Many were doubtless widows without providers. Likewise, there were always numerous orphans and children of indigents to support. Here are some examples:

Elizabeth Webb’s children, Sarah [?] Curry’s children, Finch Dean’s children, and Barbara Lewillan’s children appear in the lists.

William Vest was paid for keeping John Porter’s children; Thomas Garnett was paid for furnishings provided for the children of Mary Wright and of Robert Smith; and James Tapscott, an Overseer of the Poor, collected $30.00 for Nancy Staton’s children.

Other dependent individuals mentioned were mentally ill. Dicey Meanley’s insane son received regular support and Capt. Edward Jones was paid for aiding Joseph [?] Rakes, “a poor insane young man.”

To learn more about the history of Buckingham County’s poorhouses, consult my essay “Stewards of the Poor: Buckingham County’s Poorhouses” in “At a Place Called Buckingham” Volume Two.

Don’t miss: Buckingham County’s Poor, 1805-1820: Part VI, with a link to Roger Ward’s complete document

October 20, 2018 / Joanne Yeck

Book News: The Library of Virginia and the CCC Newspaper Collection

The work of the Civilian Conservation Corps during the Great Depression has long interested me.

My book, “At a Place Called Buckingham,” Volume Two, contains a lengthy essay concerning the history of the CCC in Buckingham County, Virginia. “Spirit and Industry: Buckingham County and the Civilian Conservation Corps,” reveals that Buckingham was home to two camps: one African-American Corps, the other comprised of white men.

The Summer 2018 issue of Library of Virginia’s quarterly, Broadside, contains a detailed article about the newspapers published by the men of the CCC across Virginia.

Click here to download a PDF of Broadside:

“News From Roosevelt’s Forest Army: Civilian Conservation Corps newspapers added to Virginia Chronical Database” by Errol Somay.

 

October 18, 2018 / Joanne Yeck

Buckingham County Houses: Osceola Restored

Osceola, 1940-1950. Courtesy L. D. Phaup.

Osceola, 2004. Courtesy L. D. Phaup.

Historic houses in Buckingham County may be the most popular posts at Slate River Ramblings.

Tangible reminders of both the past and the people who inhabited it, houses stir the imagination, suggesting pictures of everyday life in the county. This is what local history is all about. The commonplace made real once more.

Osceola is one of the oldest houses in Buckingham, once home to the Gilliam family and located about four miles west of Sheppards.

Click here to learn more: Buckingham County Houses: Osceola

 

October 15, 2018 / Joanne Yeck

Buckingham County Schools: Oak Grove Academy Incorporated

The Claiborne Home. Courtesy Virginia Currents.

In February of 1835, the Virginia General Assembly passed an Act establishing a new academy in Buckingham County. The following men were named as trustees: Thomas Trent, Thomas H. Flood, William Patteson, Thomas A. Legrand, Richard Stateham, David Robinson, Samuel J. Walker, Henry A. Christian, Mace C. Spencer, William Walton, William Stevens, Joel W. Flood, Willis P. Bocock, William D. Christian, William A. Jones, Joel Watkins, William Matthews, William Holland, Philip Watkins, Archibald Baldwin, and James M’Deeman.

That’s a lot of trustees!

These gentlemen and their successors were responsible for “any lands, tenements, rents, money, goods and chattels, of whatever kind so ever” that might be associated with the new Oak Grove Academy. Together they were to appoint a president, secretary, and treasurer, as well as engage tutors, a librarian, and any other officers that might be necessary to operate the new school.

Oak Grove Academy was located in the northeastern corner of Buckingham County, situated near the Buckingham Female Collegiate Institute and, for many years, was operated by John T. Claiborne.

Click here for more about Oak Grove Academy

Also see: The Claiborne Home

 

October 11, 2018 / Joanne Yeck

Buckingham County’s Poor, 1805-1820: Part VI

Buckingham County, Virginia, 1916.

Note Appomattox County adjacent, once part of Old Buckingham.

This series is based on Roger G. Ward’s abstracted images from “Buckingham County Virginia Loose Papers,” housed at Huntington Library in San Merino, California. A link to a PDF with his complete document can be found below.

Click here to catch up: Buckingham County’s Poor, 1805-1820: Part I

Image #48 contains records of the “Meeting of the Overseers of the Poor for Buckingham County at the courthouse June 2nd 1817.” The Overseers and their charity cases are listed by district. Remember this represents “Old Buckingham County,” the borders included much of what is today Appomattox County.

Stephen Chastain and Jesse Holeman were paid for the poor in their district, where there was a high concentration of women and children: Uriah Nixon, Dicey Meanley’s insane son, Tabitha Taylor’s children, Sarah Wooton, William Gressel, Elizabeth Taylor’s children, Sarah Anderson, Rachel Rutherford, Ann Puckett, Priscilla Beverly, Judith Sprouse, Elizabeth Loyd, Sarah Duncan and children, Rowland Sprouse, James Chenault, Jonathan Adcock, and Rebekah O’Briant.

Robert Moseley, in his district: James Falwell, John West, Mary Shaw, Mrs. Matthew’s two children, Rosa [?] Gillin and four children, Pleasant Warren, Nancy Faris, Betsey Quarles, and Marcum an old negro, as well as Pleasant Warren [for?] eight months of support.

James Tapscott, in his district: Mrs. Falwell, Mary Williams, Philip Moore, Nancy Staton’s children, and Joseph Goode.

Miles Gipson and R. Anderson, in their district: Rachel Rapier, John Porter’s 2 children, Mary Speed [?], Mary Henderson and children, Rebeckah Amos and children, as well as Salley and Polley McCormack.

William [?] Bagby, in his district: Nanny Day.

Joseph S. Dillard, his district: Sarah Curry, Gideon Via [?], Mary Williams, Charles Layne and wife, Adam and Moses Moses, Betsy Lewis, Finch Dean’s children, Nancy Faris, and Mary Smith.

John Flood, in his district: Patrick Smith and wife, Margaret Morris, Mrs. Murrain, Sarah Gunter.

Thomas Garnett, in his district: Mary Wright, Robert Scott’s children, Lucy Taylor, Robert Smiths children, and Dick, “an old negro.”

John Jones, in his district: Luch Edwards, Jemima and Magdalena Roberson, Tandy Shoemaker, and Barbara Lewellen’s children.

William Jones, in his district: Ann Elsom, Jemima and Magdalena Roberson, Elizabeth Harris, and Isaac Woodall.

Alexander Phelps was paid for his support of Nanny Day from November [1816] to June 2, 1817.  Is she the same Nanny Day in Bagby’s district?

Nathan Ayres was reimbursed for money furnished Mrs. Duncan and Mrs. Brown [?].

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Follow this link to Roger Ward’s complete transcription:

Buckingham County Virginia Loose Papers at Huntington Library San Marino, California.

Roger Ward’s invaluable volumes about Buckingham County are available at Iberian Publishing.

Learn much more about the history of Buckingham County’s poorhouses, see “Stewards of the Poor: Buckingham County’s Poorhouses” in “At a Place Called Buckingham” Volume Two.

October 8, 2018 / Joanne Yeck

Buckingham County’s Poor, 1805-1820: Part IV

Volume Two in Roger G. Ward’s indispensable series, ” Buckingham County, Virginia: Land Tax Summaries and Implied Deeds, 1815-1840.”

Roger G. Ward has abstracted images from the Buckingham County Virginia Loose Papers housed in San Marino, California at the Huntington Library. At the end of this series, there will be a link to a PDF containing his complete document.

Click here to catch up: Buckingham County’s Poor, 1805-1820: Part I

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Physicians living in Buckingham County were frequently reimbursed by the Overseers of the Poor. Grimly, others provided coffins. The loose papers at the Huntington Library include the names of the following doctors:

Dr. Reubin D. Palmer treated Catharine Whorley.

Dr. Mace C. Spencer treated Eveline Haskins.

Dr. John S. Mills and Dr. Charles Mills were reimbursed.  Were they related?

Dr. C. C. Allen, Dr. Southal, Dr. Fontain, and Dr. N. C. Spencer received funds. Is this actually Mace C. Spencer mentioned above?

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In affidavits of Virginia Soldiers of 1776, Mace Clements Spencer, of “Oakville” in Buckingham County, is identified as the son of Gideon Spencer, of Charlotte County. In 1835, Spencer became one of the trustees for Buckingham’s Oak Grove Academy.  Mary/Maria Elizabeth Walker (c.1785-1857) married Dr. Mace C. Spencer. She is believed to be his third wife. They were enumerated together on the 1850 census: Mace C. Spencer, physician, age 61; Mary, his wife, age 55; and three probable sons: Benjamin, Charles, and Samuel Spencer.

If a Slate River Ramblings reader recognizes any of these early nineteenth century physicians living in Buckingham County, please comment.

To learn more about the fascinating history of Buckingham County’s poorhouses, see my essay “Stewards of the Poor: Buckingham County’s Poorhouses” in “At a Place Called Buckingham” Volume Two.

Coming next: Buckingham County’s Poor, 1805-1820: Part V

October 4, 2018 / Joanne Yeck

Buckingham County’s Poor, 1805-1820: Part III

One of Roger G. Ward’s many Buckingham County-related publications: “Buckingham County Virginia Natives Who Died Elsewhere, 1853-1896.”

Roger G. Ward has abstracted images from the Buckingham County Virginia Loose Papers housed at the Huntington Library. This series shares tidbits from that cache. At the end of the series, there will be a link to a PDF of his complete document.

Click here to catch up:

Buckingham County’s Poor, 1805-1820: Part I

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During the nineteenth century, slaves sometimes required care by someone other than their owner. Public charity might be involved in their upkeep. Here are some examples from the “Buckingham County Virginia Loose Papers.”

John M. Reynolds was paid 20 cents, per day, per person for keeping Caty, “a negro girl,” the property of [?] Burton from March 10-July 1823 and for keeping Fanny, also Burton’s property, from March 10, 1823 to March 24, 1824.

John “McRaynolds”  [Is he John M. Reynolds above?] was paid 20 cents, per day, for keeping seven negroes who were the property of John P. Morriss, from January 10-February 9, 1824. He also kept Davey from the January 12-February 9, 1824. With Davey also Morriss’ property?

Bolling Branch boarded Wilcher, “a negro man,” who was the property of John Nicholas from August 20-September 25, 1818.

Is this Major Bolling Branch (1771-1829) who is buried in Richmond’s Shockoe Hill Cemetery and John Nicholas, the planter, who lived at Seven Islands at Buckingham County’s Horseshoe Bend? Can a Slate River Ramblings reader comment on the relationship between Bolling Branch and John Nicholas?

Learn much more about the history of Buckingham County’s poorhouses, in my essay “Stewards of the Poor: Buckingham County’s Poorhouses” in “At a Place Called Buckingham” Volume Two.

Coming next: Buckingham County’s Poor, 1805-1820: Part IV

October 3, 2018 / Joanne Yeck

 Book News: Central Virginia Heritage (Fall 2018)

I’m delighted to announce that the Fall 2018 issue of Central Virginia Heritage includes my article “Out of the Frying Pan and into the Fire: Tracing My Harris Ancestor from One Burned County to Another.”

The life of John M. Harris spread across three counties: Albemarle, Buckingham, and Appomattox.  His involvement in Buckingham County government; his military and militia service; and the determination of one of his descendants to document this Harris family—all provided clues to his long and industrious life.

Whether you are chasing genealogy or history or both, burned county courthouses can be an impediment and a great frustration. Don’t despair. Beyond county records, there are plenty of resources to investigate!

Also in the Fall 2018 issue: Fall Conference of the Virginia Genealogical Society and the Central Virginia Genealogical Association, to be held 5-6 Oct., 2018, in Charlottesville, VA; the Genealogical Library of the Daughters of the American Revolution; Preservation Grants for Presbyterian Churches; Obituary: Charles R. Moore; Census Instructions; Are You Missing Most of the Available Genealogy Information?; Benjamin Bartley, Free Negro Registration, 1808; Three Allen Wills from Buckingham County; The Southall Family of Virginia; Crowd-Sourcing on Zooniverse.org; Fredericksburg National Cemetery; and Rockingham County Cemetery Indexes.

Copies are available at Amazon.

 

October 1, 2018 / Joanne Yeck

Buckingham County’s Poor, 1805-1820: Part II

“A Typical Mammy,” 1897. Social Life in Old Virginia before the War, by Thomas Nelson Page.

Illustrated by Genevieve Cowles and Maude Cowles.

This series highlights Roger G. Ward’s abstracted images from the Buckingham County Virginia Loose Papers housed at the beautiful Huntington Library in San Marino, California.  The last post will include a link to a PDF of his complete document.

Click here to catch up: Buckingham County’s Poor, 1805-1820: Part I

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During the nineteenth century, numerous free black families lived in Buckingham County. Many were able-bodied and supported themselves. Others, due to age or infirmity, sought charity. In this sampling of entries from the “Poorhouse Accounts,” several African Americans are named. Unfortunately, most do not include surnames:

Aaron Fuqua clothed an unnamed negro woman, presumably a free black.

Mercury, “a black man,” and Dick, “a black man,” received charity, as did Markham, “an old Negro.”

B. Taylor received money for “gambling with a Negro.” (I have no clue what this means. Can a Slate River Ramblings reader help?)

John Toney was paid for removing “a mulatto boy” from Buckingham to Powhatan County.

William Moseley cared for “a poor mulatto woman” named Sarah Anderson. James Ayers also provided her with supplies. A woman named Sally Anderson furnished sundries to Sarah Anderson, again described as “a mulatto woman.” (I sense a complex story here. Does anyone recognize Sarah Anderson?)

John P. Morriss was paid for keeping seven Negroes.

The chancery case “Horsley vs Perkins” involved the care of three Negroes: Big Julius, Little Julius, and Matt.

To learn more about the history of Buckingham County’s poorhouses, see my essay “Stewards of the Poor: Buckingham County’s Poorhouses” in “At a Place Called Buckingham” Volume Two.

Coming next: Buckingham County’s Poor, 1805-1820: Part III

September 27, 2018 / Joanne Yeck

Buckingham County’s Poor, 1805-1820: Part I

Huntington Library. San Marino, California.

Recently, Roger G. Ward (who has published several indispensable reference books about Buckingham County), contacted me about the Buckingham County Virginia Loose Papers housed at the beautiful Huntington Library in San Marino, California.  While the Huntington is a long way from Central Virginia, the collection can be viewed at on a dedicated PC at LDS Family History Centers.

Roger Ward has abstracted images #43-#67, which preserve a sampling of Buckingham County’s surviving “Poorhouse Accounts.” This series of blog posts contains only a fraction of that information. The last post will include a link to a PDF of his complete document.

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Image #43 is dated June 15, 1820, when Buckingham County was just completing construction of a new poorhouse, located about three miles east of Maysville (Buckingham Court House), near Troublesome Creek, not far from today’s intersection of Highways 20 and 15. Heading the project was my ancestor George Chambers.

This document names the Overseers present that day: John M. Walker, Augustus Watkins, Powhatan Jones, Garland Brown, William Stegar, Josiah Davidson, Wm H. Puryear, Jeremiah Whitworth, Oglesby Scruggs, James Tapscott, and Jonathan P. Hardwick.  Walker was appointed “president pro tem.”

At the meeting, various citizens were reimbursed for services or items furnished Buckingham County’s needy:

Nathan Ayers moved Samuel A. Childs and family to the poorhouse.

Messrs. Garland and Freeland were reimbursed for supporting Betsey Long.

Overseer Wm H. Puryear was paid for provisions for Samuel A. Childs.

Mary Poor was paid for her services.

During the coming year, Martha Sprouse was to be paid $4 per month for “waiting on” her husband. Perhaps, Mr. Sprouse was destitute or infirm and Martha was able-bodied, directly receiving the charity.

In some instances, poor or disabled individuals were taken into a home rather than sent to the poorhouse. In these cases, the family fostering the indigent was reimbursed.

To learn more about the history of Buckingham County’s poorhouses, see my essay: “Stewards of the Poor: Buckingham County’s Poorhouses” in “At a Place Called Buckingham” Volume Two.

Coming next: Buckingham County’s Poor, 1805-1820: Part II